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Q&A; with Alex Brady, Sports Producer NFL Network

An Inside Look at Being a Woman in a Male Dominated Industry

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Controversy surrounding women in sports journalism grabs headlines, but for Alex Brady, NFL Network Producer, it’s never been an issue, “At first, some assumed I didn’t know much about sports because I was a woman. That usually subsided after having a conversation with me. I don’t think it’s ever affected my ability to get or keep a job. No one has ever treated me poorly in this business simply because I was a woman.”

Brady would know; she’s worked with some of the biggest personalities in sports TV and more than held her own.

When did you decide to pursue a career in Sports TV?

I would say it was when I was 17 years old. My high school had a “internship” program where seniors would get a week off of school to try a profession they were interested in pursuing. Till that point, I had thought I would probably go to law school and someday be a lawyer. But the thought of spending a week off from school working in a law office from 9-5 sounded positively awful.

I loved sports, I loved writing and I thought maybe I would spend the week with my favorite sports writer. I called the newspaper, got a hold of the reporter and he said I could follow him around for the week as he reported on the Philadelphia Flyers.

My first night we went to a game and I sat in the press box, I just knew that the idea of going to law school was completely over with. How could I possibly work in an office all day when I could watch games, write about them and get paid to do it?


Alex Brady’s Sports TV “Stats”

nfl network sports producerEducation: Syracuse University

Production Jobs held: Copy writer, Production Assistant, Video Editor, Associate Producer, Producer

Stations: CNN/Sports Illustrated (Atlanta), Fox Sports South (Atlanta, GA) NFL Network (Los Angeles, CA)

Best piece of advice: Learn to write. Whatever job I’ve had in this industry, as long as I can tell a good story all the other factors didn’t really matter.



You went to Syracuse University, how much did it help you in your sports TV career?

After switching my major a few times, I ended up majoring in TV, Radio and Film at Syracuse. I took a few technical classes but mostly studied writing. I think the best part of my education was the fact that most of the classes in my major focused on storytelling.

I’ve noticed that whatever job I’ve had in this industry, as long as I can tell a good story all the other factors (did I know to operate the computer/camera/editing equipment) didn’t really matter.

Where did you land your first job in Sports TV?

I actually started my career in radio, as an ad copy writer. After a year of doing that, I was promoted to a news/sports writer for the radio network. I did that for 3 years, and then decided I’d rather work in sports television.

My first sports TV job was as a production assistant at CNN/Sports Illustrated. I logged games, edited highlights and wrote the scripts for the Sportscasters to read the highlights. I loved it. To this day, it’s still the most fun I’ve ever had in television.


What’s the hardest thing about working in Sports TV?

The hardest part of working in sports TV is definitely the hours/schedule. I’ve worked countless weekends, holidays and late night or overnight shifts.

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Has it ever been a struggle or battle for respect being a woman in Sports TV?

As far as being a woman working in the sports TV world, it hasn’t really been a big issue. At first, some assumed I didn’t know much about sports because I was a woman. That usually subsided after having a conversation with me. I don’t think it’s ever affected my ability to get or keep a job. No one has ever treated me poorly in this business simply because I was a woman.

I’ve had the opportunity to work all over the country, at several different TV networks at a variety of different levels. I started off as a production assistant and eventually moved up to associate producer and then producer. I’ve worked for CNN/Sports Illustrated, a Fox regional network, and now at the NFL Network. I don’t think I would do anything differently as far as my career track has gone.

Has working in television exceeded or fallen short of your expectations?press box view sports tv

Working in television has definitely exceeded my expectations. I’ve had a birds eye view for some of the greatest sporting events in the world, I’ve met some people who were heroes to me growing up, and I’ve worked with wonderful and creative people along the way.


Do you have any advice for someone considering a career in Sports TV?

I would tell anyone starting off in this business to make sure you really love sports and are willing to sacrifice a lot of your personal and family time. I can’t tell you how many Christmases and Thanksgivings I’ve had to work. And it doesn’t get any easier, especially when you have children.


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